Energy Saving Windows Evansville

Why is Vinyl More Energy Efficient?

Windows Doors And More

Important To Arkansas

Ventilation and Weatherization


Need air? Consider which way the prevailing winds in your area blow. Maximizing ventilating windows along this line can greatly improve the fresh air in your home. A strategically-oriented casement window can even funnel breezes into your home.


Is there a side of your house that gets icy blasts of wind? Consider non-operating windows such as picture windows and radius windows on that side. These are among the best options for keeping the elements out of your home while letting natural light in. Be sure to select the most energy-efficient windows you can afford, and keep in mind that smaller windows will be more efficient in these situations.


In a bathroom, you probably will want at least one operable window to vent moisture so you don't have to rely solely on a fan.


If you desire abundant natural light and fresh air, consider window styles such as horizontal sliders and casements as well as sliding patio doors that let in lots of air and light. Ventilating skylights are a great way to let in more light while providing a place for rising warm air to leave the house.


Windows on the north, east and west walls can all be great for balancing interior light with natural light but can be energy drains in cold climates. Replacing these windows with energy-efficient options can help improve your heating bills.

Pair Vinyl Windows with Insulated Glass

It’s no secret that the right window and door system can help reduce your energy bills. But with so many different options and combinations available for frames, glazing, and seals, it can get a little confusing. Thankfully, there is an easy way to make sense of it all – and it all comes down to climate zones…

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The Zones In Evansville

Retrofit Windows

According to the Window Energy Rating Scheme’s (WERS) website, Arkansas has three major climate zones much like Australlia. A heating climate is an alpine or cooler area such as Tasmania or southern areas of Victoria, where energy is used most for heating. Hot and tropical areas like many parts of Queensland are cooling climates, where the primary use of energy is to keep the home cool. A mixed climate is an environment where energy is used for both heating and cooling equally, throughout the year.

Heating climates

Windows and Doors

If you live in a heating climate, window and door systems should work to keep you warm by keeping the heat in. For this climate, WERs recommends products that maximize the solar heat gained during the day (achieve high SHGC ratings). Insulated Glass Units (IGUs) with clear glazing are a good option. However, thermally broken frames such as the ones found on Bradnam’s Signature Thermal Break range, are optimum for reducing energy consumption in a colder climate.

Cooling Climates

Vinyl Windows

If you enjoy hot and tropical climates where you live, window and door systems perform best when they are designed to keep the heat out. Windows that limit solar heat gain (achieve low SHGC ratings) are suitable, and when combined with good insulation they work hard to keep the heat out of your home. Double glazed windows and doors with a Low-E glass on the outer pane are an option you can’t go past in these climates.

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Reading the Labels on Vinyl Windows

Best Windows For Homes

As the owner of a home repair company, I've seen an alarming trend of homeowners reporting window leaks. These leaks often result from improperly installed windows or poor home construction techniques that prompt the need for expensive, premature repairs. The following article reveals the warning signs that every homeowner can use to determine if they have a serious window leak.

Tell Tale Signs of a Window Leak

Visible moisture on the interior of your home in the vicinity of a window is a rather obvious sign of a window leak. But often there are more insidious window leaks who symptoms take far longer to spot. Unfortunately, these symptoms arise after significant damage has occurred. The description (and pictures via the link at the end of this article) will help you spot those problems before they can cost your thousands of dollars in preventable home repairs.

Case Study on the Damage from Leaking Windows

To illustrate how a small, insidious window leak can cause enormous frustration for a homeowner, let's examine a case study from a recent client that we helped in Amelia, Ohio-a suburb of Cincinnati. This home was about 8 years old, and like many tract homes built in the Cincinnati area, have 2-story great rooms with windows composing much of the exterior wall. While this is a wonderful architectural feature, the vinyl siding and construction techniques used in these homes do not generally prevent a large wall of windows like this from leaking.

  1. Does the window always leak when it rains? Or does it only leak during a heavy rain shower?
  2. Does the window leak when the rain is being driven by wind from a particular direction?
  3. How long has the window been leaking? Can you identify any event associated with the first time you noticed the window leak? (i.e. significant storm, ice event, extreme winds, etc.)
  4. Has the leak worsened? Or has it remained consistent over time?
  5. Have you attempted to stop the leak? If so, what has been done? Has that helped?
  6. If you can obtain this information, find out who built your home and when it was constructed.

Help With Window Leaks

To learn about how you can recognize the warning signs of window leaks in your home, view the video and pictures associated with this article at: http://www.mastermylist.com/windows/warning-signs-that-your-home-has-a-serious-window-leak/.

More Info: https://www.replacementwindowshub.com/arkansas-windows-lifetime-warranty/